Out with the old, in with the new. This month, we look ahead to 2019 with a roundup of articles, movies, podcasts and art exhibitions that have inspired a list of New Year’s resolutions.

Photo Credit: Entrepreneur Magazine

#1 MEET YOUR BUSINESS GOALS

Is 2019 your year to gain traction with your business idea? Garner funding? Perfect your product? Recruit the right employee? Entrepreneur Magazine talked to top business owners to create a cheat sheet of upcoming trends that will help you tackle your workplace resolutions.

#2 TAKE AN ART TRIP ABROAD

Tate Britain announced that in 2019 it will temporarily strip its free galleries of any works by male artists, and rehang the collection to celebrate its female-forged pieces. Titled “60 Years,” the exhibition will represent more than 60 works—including sculpture, painting, photography, and film—from 30 women who have played a critical role in shaping British art over the past 60 years.

Photo Credit: Tate Britain

Photo Credit: Meditation Studio

#3 ADD INTELLECT TO YOUR WELLNESS ROUTINE

With the influx of work deadlines, family time, travel and depleted budgets, this time of year can easily spiral into complete chaos—making it the perfect opportunity to begin or restart a meditation practice. We’re tuning into Untangle, a weekly podcast that dives deep into how to train your brain with advice from neuroscientists, authors, experts and thought leaders.

#4 OVERHAUL YOUR INSTAGRAM FEED

Instead of promoting slimming teas, hair vitamins or trendy eyewear, these Instagram influencers are walking the halls of Congress and joining protests in Nancy Pelosi’s office. Vogue highlights the women of the congressional freshman class—including Alexandria Ocasio-CortezIlhan OmarAyanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib—who are revolutionizing politics and social media.

Photo Credit: Vogue

Photo Credit: Amazon

#5 BRUSH UP ON WOMEN IN LITERARY HISTORY

It’s not technically a full-blown Christmas movie, but scenes of New England snowfall and challenged gender norms in the 1994 film “Little Women” have a way of putting us in the holiday spirit. We recently revisited the adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s classic and fell in love with the March sisters all over again, as they confront financial shortages, family tragedies and growing pains, all while rethinking the female identity in Civil War-era America.